WristMotion® Hemiarthroplasty System

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Wrist Arthritis
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WristMotion Implant
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WristMotion PRC
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The WristMotion® Hemiarthroplasty System restores mobility and maintains native biomechanics using a dual curved WristMotion® implant that locks into a taper post for strong fixation. preparing the implant site.The implant is designed to articulate with the natural radius bone and references the curvature of the lunate fossa. The system also consists of a set of precision instruments for mapping and preparing the implant site.

Product Features

  • 6 implant sizes & curvatures with ultra-smooth surfaces for improved volar & dorsal flexion
  • Converts a complex carpal joint into a simple, smooth radiocarpal articulating hinge
  • Replacing the capitate surface expands the Proximal Row Carpectomy’s indications to provide alternatives to fusions
  • Inlay design matches the native anatomy & optimizes stability
  • Tapered Screw & Morse Taper Interlock for proven Rock-Solid Fixation
  • Ti Plasma Spray undercoating provides excellent implant fixation characteristics
  • WristMotion® system references the native anatomy of the lunate fossa to prescribe the ideal implant curvature
  • Two Diameters and multiple curvature options allow an off-the-shelf custom fit into a single modular taper post
  • Minimal Hardware implanted into a single bone creates a reproducible and technically simple procedure that does not require the fusing of adjacent bones

Surgical Technique

slac wrist arthritisThe WristMotion® implant system is comprised of two parts; an articular cap and a fixation component (screw). Instruments are organized in the order of surgery, proceeding from left to right and top to bottom. After exposing the joint, a proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is performed. Once the PRC is complete, templates are placed on the lunate fossa to determine the curvature in both planes. When the lunate fossa curvatures are identified, the appropriate WristMotion® replacement implant is chosen. The WristMotion® procedure begins by using a guide to identify the size of the capitate head. Next, a guide wire is driven through the guide and into the capitate bone so it is perpendicular to the head. A step drill is then driven over the guidewire to a fixed level. This prepares the bone tunnel for screw placement. Before putting in the screw, the tunnel is tapped. The screw component is then advanced into the tunnel until the etch line and the screwdriver is even with the surface. If additional joint space is required, decompression can be achieved by advancing the screw 2-4mm. Mapping instruments are then inserted into the screw and used to measure the contours of the patient’s native bone surface by using the fixation component as a central axis to define the appropriate reamer. The appropriate Reamer is then placed over a guide-wire which is inserted into the screw. Advance the reamer until it hits the screw, creating the distal socket for the implant. Next, a volar reamer is inserted into the screw to ream the volar socket. Once the sockets are reamed, a trial is placed into the surface to assess proper implant fit. When the surface preparation is complete, the definitive WristMotion® implant is positioned and seated into the reamed area with several taps of the mallet.

Advantages for the Patient

  • HemiCAP® technology was designed so patients can continue working and maintain an active lifestyle without compromising future treatments
  • May be performed on an outpatient basis
  • Allows for preservation of bone, soft tissues and surrounding structures
  • Bridges the gap between biological therapies and joint fusion
  • Patients can return to activity more rapidly for both work and exercise

Advantages for the Surgeon

  • Proven Rock-Solid Fixation (data on file at Arthrosurface)
  • TheWristMotion® procedure is intuitive and easy to learn
  • The minimally invasive outpatient procedure typically takes less than an hour
  • Skeletal anatomy and bone stock are preserved allowing future fusion or total wrist
  • The two components are connected together via morse taper

WHAT’S NEW FROM THE BLOG

  • Quick Facts

    • The most common cause of knee pain is osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease that causes the cartilage in your joints to break down. When that layer of cartilage — which is meant to “cushion” the joints and protect the surface of the bones — is damaged or worn away, your bones grind against one another, and that grinding hurts. You can feel it climbing stairs, working in the garden, or just bending your knees to sit. It may even keep you up at night.
    • OA can damage the entire knee or be limited to just one side of the knee. If you experience pain only on one side, or compartment, of your knee, your doctor may diagnose you with unicompartmental OA.
    • If you experience knee pain under the knee cap, your doctor may diagnose you with patello-femoral OA. This is not uncommon, as studies have shown that about one out of every 10 patients over the age of 40 have patello-femoral disease.
    • The factors leading to the development and progression of OA include aging, obesity, joint injuries, and a family history of arthritis (genetics). Although there is no cure, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in slowing or preventing more damage to your joints.
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